Clovis PD Unveils Largest Fleet of Zero Electric Police Motorcycles in the United States

Clovis Police Motor Officers pose with their Zero Electric motorcycles and Electric Ford Focus. (Photo contributed)

CLOVIS ROUNDUP STAFF
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Clovis Police Motor Officers and Support Staff now have additional resources that also help the valley air as Clovis PD unveiled two additional Zero Electric motorcycles on Friday, April 14, to go along with its fleet of the five that we acquired in August 2014. With the addition of these two Zero electric motorcycles, Clovis Police now have the largest fleet of Zero electric police motorcycles in the United States.

These seven Zero electric motorcycles will allow officers to not only patrol the streets, but also parks, bike paths, shopping centers, and community events as they put out no exhaust and generate no noise. In addition to the two additional Zero electric motorcycles, two electric Ford Focuses were also purchased. The Fords will be used by support staff during their daily responsibilities in Fresno County, and also generate no exhaust.

As with the original five Zero electric motorcycles purchased in 2014, these additional vehicles were purchased using money from the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District Public Benefit Grant Program – and no taxpayer dollars were used. All seven Zero motorcycles were purchased from Eckhaus Fleet, and both Fords were purchased from Future Ford, both based in Clovis.

This announcement is coming during National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, where additional focus and enforcement is concentrated specifically on distracted drivers. Clovis Police traffic officers have joined other law enforcement agencies throughout the state to provide educational experiences as well as zero tolerance enforcement efforts to discourage distracted driving. Officers will have a special emphasis this month on enforcing all cell phone and distracted driving laws. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that 3,477 people were killed and an estimated 391,000 injured in motor vehicle collisions involving distracted drivers in 2015 – a nine percent increase in fatalities compared to the previous year.